Want Your Own Calming Japanese Garden? Listen to our FREE Podcast

If you are keen on making a Japanese garden or creating your own Japanese garden in a small space at home in your yard or garden then why not try the ‘Turn Your Garden Japanese ‘ Podcast.

We have just launched it and over the coming months it will be packed with really helpful practical tips on creating a Japanese garden.

Check it out and LISTEN to it HERE

And you could have your own Japanese garden that looks something like this….

Japanese Garden Basin

How To Make A Japanese Garden In 30 Days – The Help And Knowledge You NEED


Find out how you can easily have your own dream Japanese garden space at home by visiting: http://www.expressjapanesegardenclub.com

 

Making a Japanese Garden In A Small Space On PINTEREST

Here’s some of our Pinterest boards with LOTS of useful HELP, ADVICE and INSPIRATION for making a Japanese garden at home.

Follow Japanese Garden Information’s board Making A Japanese Zen Garden on Pinterest.

 

Check out the Express Japanese Garden Club too. Create your own Japanese garden space – guaranteed for under $5.00!

www.expressjapanesegardenclub.com

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Japanese Gardens Are At Their Best In Spring…

JG11PFG Waterfall & Lantern

David M Cobb is perhaps the world’s most famous photgrapher of Japanese gardens. He lectures, has written books and is the ‘go to’ guy for pictures of Japanese gardens.

If you haven’t seen David’s unique talent then take a look at this BLOG entry – he has been out and about photographing a Japanese gardens in Spring – one of the most magical times of the year to do so. The picture above is one of David’s of the Japanese Friendship garden in Phoenix Arizona in the United States.Enjoy!

CLICK HERE TO SEE DAVID’S BLOG AND WORK

David’s images will hopefully inspire you to think about having your own Japanese garden in a small space! It’s a lot easier than you may think and our free book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ will show you exactly how and give you lots of inspiration too – for making a Japanese garden.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR FREE COPY

 

Free for a LIMITED time

Claim Your Free Copy Now

Japanese Garden Books Package For Making A Japanese Garden

Creating a Japanese garden does take a little knowledge and an equal measure of inspiration too!

From www.japanesegardenbooks.com author and Japanese garden expert Russ Chard gives you the perfect package of 3 Japanese garden books that will help you have your own Japanese garden space at home AND at 50 per cent off the Amazon price too!

CLICK HERE for details and how you can secure this special offer.

Japanese_garden_books_001CLICK HERE to take advantage of this offer.

Making A Japanese Garden Now on Google +

Just to let you know we are now on Google plus CLICK HERE for our Japanese garden page all about making a Japanese garden and creating Japanese gardens generally.

Googleplus

Creating A Japanese Garden For Your Yard Or Garden – Presentation To View


A short presentation to help with creating a Japanese garden in your yard or garden. The presentation explains what is required and what you should consider and DO to create your own Japanese garden in a small space.

CLICK HERE for our FREE Japanese garden design book to really help get you started and to give you some wonderful ideas.

Making A Japanese Garden – Some Unlikely Inspiration?!

norway

On a recent visit to Norway I visited an extraordinary tropical flora garden on an island near Stavanger.

It was stunning and is a garden that was developed with countless years of planning and careful planting. The family that run it used to run a flower business in the city but the grandfather found a small island to relax in and his love of gardening started to take over!

It is now over 20 acres big and features a large bamboo and bonsai garden. If you are intending making a Japanese garden at your home – or maybe it is a distant drweam?!- you will get some inspiration from these pictures.

They are from a board of pictures we have set up on Pinterest dedicated to our garden visit. Acers, Maples, Koi, pathways, edging, bonsai trees of all sizes, bamboo, rocks and a lot more. Take a look and be inspired!  CLICK HERE TO SEE THE GARDEN

For even more EASY to understand Japanese garden ideas to help you make that special stress free garden area claim a free copy of my latest book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese‘ by CLICKING HERE

Design Principles For Making A Japanese Garden At Home

Pathway 1

The first design principle to be absolutely clear about when making a Japanese garden is that ALL elements of nature are present in these types of gardens. In Western style gardens it is usually far fewer elements of nature that are used in any one garden area.

Japanese gardens use more water – whether wet or dry- than a Western garden. Rocks and stones are much more common as ingredients too. There are reasons for this and a read up on Japanese garden history will explain all.

Gardens in Japanese culture have spiritual, historical and cultural meaning. You can read about all the aspects of Japanese gardening in one free book that I have prepared for you CLICK HERE to get your copy and also for access to my Japanese garden Newsletter called ‘The Japanese Garden Bulletin’.

For now I want to simplify the design principles so that making your own Japanese garden is simple and straightforward.

Most Japanese gardens reflect real landscapes that you see in nature. This is something called ‘borrowed scenery’. What a designer does is copy a real piece of scenery only in miniature.

You don’t have to do this because you have something called an imagination. Don’t be afraid to use it,think about the elements that you would like in your ‘mini’ landscape garden and let your mind wander. Use stones and rocks as hills and mountains, sand or gravel as water, small shrubs and grasses as plantings, trees like Acers / Maples and so on.

Think of creating a scene that catches your imagination and reduce its scale to give you a manageable garden space. There is nothing to stop you thinking big but that does mean a lot of work – it is far better to start making a Japanese garden on a small scale and once you have confidence and more knowledge increase the scale.

A pond could signify a lake, raked gravel the swirling movement of an ocean. A lot of people like water in a garden space – in a Japanese garden you can do this although in a Zen garden it is not generally included as the sand and gravel are the water area.

Flowing water in a Japanese garden signifies the passage of time. Fountains are rare but waterfalls ( more natural) are fra more commonplace.

Japanese gardens usually appear very ordered and manicured but can also be wild and even tropical in design. This gives you a lot of options depending on what garden space you have vaialable and what sort of climate you have.

One thing that I recommend is a border for your garden. It is the division between your peaceful , stress free haven and the outside world with all the distractions that go with it.I prefer a border of bamboo eith in cane form or using a growth of black bamboo for example.

Fencing ( low level) is more rustic in look and you can have a gate in a Japanese garden , usually they are found only in Tea gardens.a nice touch in larger gardens is to separate areas of a Japanese garden with different borders as the viewer and visitor moves seamlessly between areas of the garden.

Never over clutter a Japanese garden. The Japanese enjoy free space and the elements of your garden will look more natural and stand out as a result. If you want to plant dry climate plants or cactus in a Zen / Japanese rock garden then space them out to get the same effect. Less is more in a Japanese garden space and empty areas are not only authentic but pleasing on the eye to the creator and visitor!

For some really great ideas for turning your garden Japanese at home , however large or small your space, you can get a free copy of my latest book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese ‘ by CLICKING HERE

 

Trees, Plants and Shrubs For Making A Japanese Garden

Acer1Satoyama Chelsea flower show 2012

 

When making a Japanese garden it should look older and more established than its surroundings. Plants, Shrubs and Trees can help bring your garden space to life and make it appear at one with nature.

Avoid over cluttering your garden and you may find that you have to slightly control your enthusiasm. Always pick living ingredients that suit the climate where you live and don’t be afraid to plant trees like Maples in colder climates as they survive in Japan in temperatures well below minus 10 degrees.

The heat of the sun is more of an enemy than the cold and ice.

This article is going to give you some suggestions on what to consider adding to your Japanese style garden and I promise not to get too technical. But if you want to find out more detailed information you can download a free copy of my book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ by CLICKING HERE. As you become more adept at this form of gardening and you acquire more knowledge you can start to spread your wings a little.

A popular common element in a Japanese garden and Zen gardens are small Coniferous shrubs. Evergreens provide colour all year round and will help your other trees and plants stand out during their seasonal changes.

A good rule of thumb when making a Japanese garden is for every Deciduous planting plant 2 evergreens. Coniferous shrubs really fit the bill as they are hardy and require little maintenance apart from some minor shaping and pruning. They really look striking when planted near rocks and stones and because they start off small and the view actually gets better over time. Remember to plant with spaces between them and other shrubs or rocks to allow this growth.

You have literally hundreds of varieties and species of Coniferous shrubs to choose from and popular ones include Mugo Pine, Dwarf Balsam firs and Next Spruce.

Bamboo is another popular addition in a Japanese garden not only for separating areas but also in plant form. Tea gardens always have arrangements of Bamboo but for your small space garden then these are the varieties of Bamboo plants that will work best sasa, dake, chiku and take.

Japanese garden plants are chosen for their flowering and if you want a cavalcade of colour to contrast with your evergreens and trees then Herbaceous Japanese plants will be the solution.

Morning glory , Iris, deadnettle, Lily Turf, Kuzu Vine, White Radish, Japanese Pampas grass, Henbit, Horse Radish, Japanese Ardisia, Peony, White Chrysanthemum are plants that flower very colourfully but also in most cases have very green leaves providing a beautiful contrast.

You can use Azaleas and Camellias to great effect as well. For the spectacular there is the climbing Japanese Wisteria which grows vertically and is covered in white flowers to a maximum height of approximately 5 feet.

Bonsai plants/trees are popular too but be warned they take quite a lot of looking after and need to be skilfully watered and pruned. These are usually placed in suitably sized pots or containers around the garden area. Some like the Japanese Maple bonsai look wonderful planted between two rocks whilst others like Japanese Black Pine or Japanese White Pine , Plum and Cherry flourish better in a container.

By far the most popular bonsai plant in a Japanese garden is the Japanese Black Pine which is hardy and looks green all year round. A balance of colour is what you are looking to achieve throughout the 12 months of the year.

I hope you have found this useful and you can find out a lot more about creating your own Japanese garden space at home for a feeling of peace and serenity by claiming your copy of my FREE book and Japanese garden newsletter called ‘The Japanese Garden Bulletin’ by CLICKING HERE.

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