Japanese Gardens Are At Their Best In Spring…

JG11PFG Waterfall & Lantern

David M Cobb is perhaps the world’s most famous photgrapher of Japanese gardens. He lectures, has written books and is the ‘go to’ guy for pictures of Japanese gardens.

If you haven’t seen David’s unique talent then take a look at this BLOG entry – he has been out and about photographing a Japanese gardens in Spring – one of the most magical times of the year to do so. The picture above is one of David’s of the Japanese Friendship garden in Phoenix Arizona in the United States.Enjoy!

CLICK HERE TO SEE DAVID’S BLOG AND WORK

David’s images will hopefully inspire you to think about having your own Japanese garden in a small space! It’s a lot easier than you may think and our free book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ will show you exactly how and give you lots of inspiration too – for making a Japanese garden.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR FREE COPY

 

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Japanese Garden Books Package For Making A Japanese Garden

Creating a Japanese garden does take a little knowledge and an equal measure of inspiration too!

From www.japanesegardenbooks.com author and Japanese garden expert Russ Chard gives you the perfect package of 3 Japanese garden books that will help you have your own Japanese garden space at home AND at 50 per cent off the Amazon price too!

CLICK HERE for details and how you can secure this special offer.

Japanese_garden_books_001CLICK HERE to take advantage of this offer.

Making A Japanese Garden Now on Google +

Just to let you know we are now on Google plus CLICK HERE for our Japanese garden page all about making a Japanese garden and creating Japanese gardens generally.

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Creating A Japanese Garden For Your Yard Or Garden – Presentation To View


A short presentation to help with creating a Japanese garden in your yard or garden. The presentation explains what is required and what you should consider and DO to create your own Japanese garden in a small space.

CLICK HERE for our FREE Japanese garden design book to really help get you started and to give you some wonderful ideas.

Making A Japanese Garden – Flat Gardens

Flat gardens within Japanese garden culture one of the simplest forms of gardens you can consider when planning a Japanese garden space.

Flat gardens, or Hira-niwa in Japanese ,do not have hills and do not have any water in the way that a western garden would. The flat area which is essentially made of either sand or more usually gravel IS the water. All Japanese gardens tend to be a lesson in environment and space.

Part of Portland's Japanese Flat Garden Courtesy of www.tripadvisor.com

Part of Portland’s Japanese Flat Garden Courtesy of www.tripadvisor.com

Just like in a Zen garden the gravel is raked into swirls and different shapes to give the impression of the movement in a body of water. The ground is usually covered this way and on occasions I have seen flat gardens that use very small pebbles ,once again raked in circles and straight lines to give the impression of water  ripples.

A flat garden can include many familiar ingredients that you would expect when making a Japanese garden. Stones, Rocks, Trees and Shrubs are very common. The trees although natural will be pruned and the low level shrubs and bushes shaped on the edge of the water space.

Courtesy of www.japanesegarden.com

Courtesy of www.japanesegarden.com

Flat gardens were first designed to interpret and in miniature mimic Japan’s seaside landscapes or some of its grander lakes, a journey through Japanese garden history points to war and water shortages as to why water was replaced by gravel as a ‘dry’ substitute. This is a trend that has continued for hundreds of years even in peacetime and with abundant supplies of water. The Edo period of Japanese history is when flat gardens became very popular.

Interestingly water features apart from a body of water are fairly common in a Japanese ‘Flat’ garden. For example, large upright stones can symbolise a waterfall and this something that you can copy for a garden space that you have in mind however large or small.

Use non sharp edged rocks or stones ( Granite) to depict islands within your gravel water area. 3 together is a popular representation of ‘The Isles of The Immortals’.The Japanese Circle and Gourd Islands are often copied and represented in the gravel water area to add the spirit of enlightenment. You will be able to get the correct rocks and stones from your local aggregate supplier – take sometime to consider the shapes that you want and strictly speaking for authenticity you should not use rounded stones.

Other ingredients that you may wish to add to a flat garden are stone lanterns, included for the illumination of parts of the garden at night, basins and if you are very ambitious even a well ! Well’s are normally constructed out of wood and have some way of getting the water out of the well – a pulley and bucket or a large wooden spoon are common.

Stepping stones can be placed across the gravel water area and look very effective if they lead to the far side of the gravel area where a rustic hut or pagoda is located. After the 16th century this was a popular type of design where the hut would be used for the slow and meaningful Tea ceremony.

A completed flat garden will give a real impression of depth of space to the viewer as the eye is drawn into the water area with the clipped shrubs on the faraway edge. The stones or rocks placed carefully within the raked gravel ‘water’ area give a feeling of depth and perspective relative to the scale of the garden.

As a Zen garden is designed to be viewed from a single space it is exactly the same with a Japanese flat garden. The view is sometimes ‘framed’ when a veranda door is opened or when looking through a larger window into the garden itself.

A flat garden is often seen as similar to a landscape painting when designed and built correctly to scale. The viewer’s eyes are drawn across the water to the carefully clipped low level shrubs and plants like Lilies or Azeleas. In Japan plantings are deliberately made in a flat garden to show off the seasons.

Maples for the autumn , Cherry blossom looks its best in Spring, the soothing impression of water signifies summer and something like a Black Pine denotes the winter.

Flat gardens became an alternative to hill gardens in Japan as were amongst then first residential gardens added to the homes of ordinary Japanese people and they continue to be a wonderful type of garden today for any yard or garden area.

I believe a ‘Flat’ or Hira-niwa garden is a cost effective and beautiful option for a domestic Japanese garden as it includes some of the essential ingredients needed for a Japanese garden as well as the classic Japanese garden design method of borrowed scenery. This is where the designer either copies a specific landscape in miniature or use existing scenery such as a hill located outside of the flat garden space to include it in the overall garden view.

But, lets face it, not many of us have a natural piece of landscape that we can include in our overall design so just the copying of a real or imaginary landscape will be more than enough. Creating miniature landscapes allows your creative juices to flow and your imagination to run wild! All the more reason to get started on building your dream Japanese garden space.

For more help with a flat garden design and how to develop your own stunning Japanese garden get your free copy of my latest book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ by CLICKING HERE

Best Wishes and I hope you have found this information useful and inspiring for your own Japanese garden space!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ from Making A Japanese Garden Dot Com

Hi,
Thanks for visiting makingajapanesegarden.com.

If you have always wanted or dreamt of a Japanese style garden space for your home whether indoors or outdoors then I have some great news for you. Launched today is my new FREE book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ and this short video will tell you more. Take a look!

To find out more and how you can make your Japanese garden dream a reality without breaking the bank! CLICK HERE for your complimentary copy and free membership to ‘The Japanese Garden Bulletin’ our weekely new newsletter for fans of Japanese gardens and making a Japanese garden.

 

The Japanese Garden Bulletin NEW Newsletter – Listen To What It’s About…

Hii,

Thanks for stopping by making a Japanese garden dot com.

In a very short while I am launching an exciting, interesting and inspiring newsletter on Japanese gardens …it will be totally free and take a listen to my little message about the service I am providing for Japanese garden enthusiasts.If you love Japanese gardens or dream, of your own Zen garden ( sometimes referred to as a Japanese Rock garden) you will love the design tips and information that I have got for you.

Delivered straight to your ‘inbox’ EVERY week ‘The Japanese Garden Bulletin’ will help you make your dream of a relaxing Japanese garden become a reality…and it’s not as difficult as you may think!

CLICK on the audio players ‘Arrow’ to LISTEN

 

 

Happy New Year From ALL Of Us At Making A Japanese Garden Dot Com

Thank you for visiting our website that is all about giving you useful information and tips for making a Japanese garden. There is a lot of very informative and helpful information on this website that will help turn your small or large space at home whether indoors or outdoors into a space with a touch of Japan.

We wish all our readers a very Happy New Year and a HEALTHY and inspiring 2013!

We are starting a FREE Japanese garden NEWSLETTER at the end of January called the ‘Japanese Garden Bulletin’.

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You can sign up for free to ensure that you recieve a massive amount of Japanese garden and Zen garden information at this website , where you can read more about the sort of information we will be providing in our ‘Japanese Garden Bulletin’ newsletter.

We never share your email with anyone else or any third parties and you can unsubscribe at ANY time with a click of your mouse or a tap on your smatphone or tablet!

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Making A Japanese Garden – A Little Inspiration Goes A Long Way…

If you are thinking of making a Japanese garden and want to turn your rear garden or yard into a calming and peaceful area then you are joining a growing band of like minded people all over the world.

Japanese gardens and Zen gardens are in vogue and this website has been set up specifically to give you a little inspiration for your dream project!

A little honesty first though. Making a Japanese garden is not something that you can do with any degree of success or the right results in a weekend and it WILL take up quite a lot of maintenance time but if you are not phased by either of these aspects then your hard work will be rewarded with a truly lovely space at your home.

More good news comes in the form of your budget. Japanese gardens can be expensive to design and build but you can construct one on a limited budget and in today’s economic climate a lot of people do you financial constraints.

One of the most cost effective ways of making a Japanese garden is to identify an area in your yard or garden, mark it out with string or cable and dig it out to a low level say approximately 4 -6 inches deep.Take precautions for weed growth and fill the area with gravel or you can use sand if you live in a dry climate.

Gravel should be ideally 8 to 10 mm in size as it is easy for raking – so you get those lovely circular swooshes and simple staright lines. Rocks can be placed in small clusters and you can use smooth rocks but taller slightly jagged ones really look striking to the eye.

I have a small space Zen garden at home with a cluster of 3 rocks and a single rock on an island surrounded by neatly trimmed grass – this gives the impression of an island in the sea. Zen gardens or Karesansui ( Dry gardens) mimic landscapes so the good news is that you can let your imagination flow!

A dry river bed is another option and you can surround this with stones and rocks and low level plants. If you desire a wooden bridge or stone bridge this would look spectacular over the bed.

Bamboo is used in Japanese gardens for space separation and fencing can be bought or made relatively inexpensively. Trees provide the ‘living’ element of the garden and have to be planted correctly, drainage has to be good and equally importantly you should only pick trees, plants and low level shrubs that will grow in your climate.

If you plant things that are risky then the chances are you will be removing them sooner than you had hoped for. Trees are central to many types of Japanese gardens and in autumn or fall they come into their own.

I shall be putting some information on this website in the very near future about which trees are perhaps best to use in non extreme European and North American climates AND most importantly what colours you can expect from them in the autumn for maximum effect in a Japanese garden.

Water features are something a lot of people desire , with or without Koi for example and this is something else that I am going to cover here on makingajapanesegarden.com in the near future.

I have launched a Japanese garden free newsletter  called the ‘Japanese Garden Bulletin’ and you can register to recieve your complimentary copy featuring Japanese garden news, tips , design ideas and a LOT more just CLICK HERE

Making A Japanese Garden – Boundaries

However large or small Japanese gardens have at least one entrance and the simplest explanation of this is that when entering the garden you are part of a seperate world. When making a japanese garden this is something that you must consider.

If you have armarked a space for your Japanese garden then really think about this important ingredient – the entrance. Think carefully about the boundary of your garden – will it have a stone or brick wall on any of the sides, what will the shape be and where are you planning on putting plants, trees, shrubs, pathways etc.

Entrances and boundaries are ideally identified in positional terms first. I always advise the drawing of a design sletch before any construction begins. This will allow you to be very detailed and clear in your thoughts for making a Japanese garden AND will help you to reconcile your space with your plans when you are standing by your bare piece of land.

A plan really works. It crystalises your design in your minds eye and is very helpful with the placement of entrances and boundaries. Bamboo is very popular for boundaries but to keep it authentic try and use a Japanese bamboo – a lot of display Japanese gardens around the world make a big deal of Bamboo ( quite rightly) but more often than not it will be a Chinese bamboo!

Boundaries signify the end of one world and the beginning of the next – your garden. You may want a pathway leading to a gate or more than one pathway. They should alwyas be at right-angle with no smooth corners as the Japanese believe that demons need smooth corners to be able to change direction.

A path leading to a gate or from it is a great place to start planning when making a Japanese garden , look at it as the first few correct pieces in a jigsaw and you build your design and garden ingredients from there.

Boundaries can also be used bewteen different areas of your garden and bamboo fences make a simple and relatively cheap way of doing it and they are pleasing on the eye because of their authenticity.

One very important principle in Japanese gardening to consider is that everything you do in your garden in terms of design and maintenance should appear to not have been interfered with by humans – its appearance should be natural.

Taking that principle into account for boundaries within a Japanese garden is not that difficult – you have just got to know what to do. Our free design book ’11 Simple Ways To Turn Your Garden Japanese’ has a section on boundaries . What to use, how to use your chosen boundary within your garden ideas and design CLICK HERE for your FREE copy.